Banqueros Automáticos:The computers that run the stock market

Citadel Securities has quietly become one of the largest forces in U.S. stock trading.

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From the 35th floor of a downtown Chicago office tower, Citadel executes one out of every eight stock trades in the United States. At roughly 900 million shares a day, more stocks move through Citadel’s systems than the New York Stock Exchange, which trades roughly 700 million shares a day.

If you own a 401(k) or have ever used an online broker, your trades have almost certainly passed through Citadel.

The most notable thing about the firm’s trading floor is how eerily quiet it can be.

About 40 people “run” the trading floor, but they are simply overseeing computers that use algorithms to fill and route stock orders.

Related: High speed traders pay for an edge

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Welcome to the new world of trading: More and more, high speed computer programs are replacing thousands of floor brokers once seen running and yelling across the floor of the NYSE.

Citadel’s “floor” brokers don’t do a lot of running. They sit together behind rows of computer terminals, clicking away on keyboards to ensure the firm’s computers are operating correctly and are connected to all the right exchanges.

In essence, Citadel’s proprietary computer programs have become the new eyes, ears, and brains of the U.S. stock market.

About 20 programmers create the computer algorithms that decide how to execute each order, and what to send to public exchanges or so-called dark pools.

Dark pools may sound like the favorite haunts of Star Wars villains, but they are simply venues where buyers and sellers can submit bids without disclosing them to the public markets. Citadel operates a dark pool called Apogee out of its New York office.

Citadel’s programmers are constantly making adjustments as computers “learn” customer behavior to make the process more efficient.

“All the decisions are made by the computers,” Jamil Nazarali, Citadel’s head of electronic execution, told CNNMoney during an exclusive behind-the-scenes tour. “The people here are not making any decisions with respect to whether an order should be filled or at what price it should be filled. That’s all done in an automated way.”

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Split second decisions: Citadel’s computers execute a buy or sell order nearly instantaneously.

When Citadel’s computers do not to fill an order internally, the trade is pushed along to one of 13 public exchanges or one of more than 20 dark pools.

By law, Citadel must match or give a better price than what’s been quoted on a public exchange, said Nazarali.

But some industry watchers question whether Citadel’s prescient computer programs are always giving customers the best price.

Nazarali says they do: “As a market maker, I have a regulatory obligation to fill all customers orders on my book before I trade.”

He said Citadel’s systems actually create an even playing field between high-speed traders and retail traders who place orders through brokers like TD Ameritrade (AMTD)because they all have access to the same technology.

The industry’s primary regulator, FINRA, recently asked some market makers and dark pool operators to provide information on how they fill trading orders. Regulators are worried about high-speed traders get an edge over other investors in certain trading venues. It’s unclear if Citadel was part of that group, and FINRA declined to comment.

Trading is definitely faster, but whether it’s better and cheaper for the average retail investor remains to be seen.

Principal regulador de la industria, FINRA, recientemente pidió a algunos creadores de mercado y operadores de piscinas oscuras para proporcionar información sobre cómo se llenan las órdenes de operaciones. Los reguladores están preocupados por los operadores de alta velocidad consiguen una ventaja sobre otros inversores en determinados centros de negociación. No está claro si la ciudadela era parte de ese grupo, y FINRA declinó hacer comentarios.

El comercio es definitivamente más rápido, pero si es mejor y más barato para el inversor minorista medio aún está por verse.

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देवताओं और गोल्ड: Metacapital Mortgage Opportunities

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                                            Manager: Deepak Narula

Management Firm: Metacapital Management

Location: U.S.

Strategy: Mortgage-backed arbitrage

Assets, in billions: $1.5

YTD total return: 37.8%

2011 return: 23.6%

(Reuters) – Deepak Narula, one of the hedge fund industry’s best known mortgage bond traders, said he sees a much tougher year ahead for investors but sees opportunities in certain mortgage trades.

Next year will “be a more challenging year” than 2013 because of “much greater uncertainty around how the Fed will behave,” and because of lofty bond and equity valuations, Narula, the founder of $1.45 billion hedge fund Metacapital Management, said on Wednesday.

This year Narula’s main fund has struggled to produce gains, though an investor recently told Reuters the portfolio has been able to reduce losses in the last few months. However, the firm’s $240 million Rising Rates fund, launched in May, has climbed about 14 percent year-to-date.

Last year, Metacapital’s flagship fund soared more than 40 percent, as structured credit funds rose about 19 percent on averaged. “Absent some large shock to the system” that causes initial cheapening of assets “those returns are history,” Narula said.

Those funds have only risen about 8 percent on average this year.

Managers who invested in residential mortgage-backed securities throughout 2012 and the beginning of 2013 benefited mightily from the Federal Reserve’s efforts to keep interest rates low, which pushed up the prices of mortgage bonds.

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Deepak Narula has given us some sound advice – you want to be careful going against the mission of the Federal Reserve.

And, his hedge fund earned a 38 percent return last year, the number one hedge fund performer according to Bloomberg News.

“To revive the housing market, the Fed has thrown a lot of firepower at agency mortgage-backed securities. Policy makers have worked hard to let homeowners refinance. They’ve been clear that that’s their mission-and you want to be careful going against that mission.”

George Soros, who bet against the British pound in the 1990s and made millions of dollars, I’m sure, would agree.

In addition, three of the top five funds in the Bloomberg Markets list of top performing hedge funds also were investors in mortgage securities.

“Betting on mortgage securities outpaced every other strategy, with an average return of 20.2 percent against an industry average of just 1.3 percent,” states the Bloomberg report.

But, hedge funds are not the only ones that benefited from the Federal Reserve action. Check out these two posts: “Is it too late to get into the housing rebound?” and “Is it too late to get into the housing rebound? Part Two“.

Three cheers for saving the middle class!

Nothing seems to work better as a way to make money than to work with a government policy or program. Ask the people who started up Solyndra!

The major problem with betting against a government policy or program … don’t be too early.

Narula has not always been successful in playing the mortgage market. He started his fund Metacapital in 2002. He saw the danger in the market for subprime mortgages as early as 2005 and start shorting them. Subprime mortgages did tank, but not until three years later.

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In 2006 his fund had to return money to investors and in 2007 he had to close the fund. He was “right,” but then again, he was “wrong.”

As he states, “If you are too early, you are wrong.”

But, betting “with” government policy works on the upside as well.

Over the past fifty years or so, the federal government, supported by the Federal Reserve, created credit by the millions of dollars in order to keep unemployment at low levels and to foster home ownership for the middle class and below. We had a sustained period of “credit inflation.”

Three things happen in a period of credit inflation: people take on more and more risk; people build up more and more financial leverage; and people engage in financial innovation. The last fifty years is known for all three of these things happening.

And, during this period, more and more people went to work in the financial and more and more companies added financial subsidiaries. By the early2000s, a substantially greater percentage of Americans worked in the financial sector than ever before. And, many manufacturing companies, likeGeneral Electric (GE) and General Motors (GM), earned more than fifty percent of their profits from their financial subsidiaries.

The “mission” of the federal government and the Federal Reserve System was to provide the economy with high levels of employment and greater degrees of home ownership.

The mental attitude of the leaders of American finance and industry? Well, as summarized by Charles (Chuck) Prince, the CEO of Citigroup, “”As long as the music is playing, you’ve got to get up and dance.”

Those that left the dance floor “too soon” were “right” that things were getting too risky and might fall apart. But, as Narula said, “If you are too early, you are wrong.”

Your government creates opportunities to make money … and to make lots of it. The big money to earn will, however, not go to those that will help to reduce the imbalance in the income/wealth curve. As we have seen, the past fifty years of credit inflation have done more to create the imbalances that now exist than reduce them.

And, government “missions” will continue to do so in the future.

So, one way to make money is to determine what is the federal government or the Federal Reserve “mission” and bet “with” the mission. That is, find out what these people are trying to do and develop an investment strategy that “uses” this mission. We know that the federal government and the Federal Reserve, in their well-meaning way, will continue on with their policies for a long time.

The Federal Reserve says that short-term interest rates will remain low until 2015. Really?

George Soros can tell you that when a government positions itself in this way, opportunities exist.

But, remember what Narula said – to be too early is to be wrong. Also, if you try and get into the game too late or stick around the game for too long, you will be wrong.

Timing is important.

Three cheers for Deepak Narula!

Location Type Single Location
State of Incorporation New York
Annual Revenue Estimate 120000
Employees 2
SIC Code 6722, Management Investment Offices, Open-End
NAICS Code 525910, Open-End Investment Funds
Business Categories

Dinero del Cielo: Investing in Facebook

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Facebook (FB) just bought WhatsApp, paying $16bn in cash and stock and $3bn in RSUs. WhatsApp has 450m active users, of which 72% are active every day. It has just 32 engineers. And its users share 500m photos a day, which is almost certainly more than Facebook.

This is interesting in all sorts of ways – it illustrates most of the key trends in consumer tech today in one deal. First, it shows the continued determination of Facebook to be the ‘next’ Facebook. It’s striking to compare the aggressive reaction to disruption shown by Google (GOOG), Facebook and other leading web companies today with how some of their predecessors a decade ago stumbled and lost their way.

  • Smartphone apps can access your address book, bypassing the need to rebuild your social graph on a new service
  • They can access your photo library, where uploading photos to different websites is a pain
  • They can use push notifications instead of relying on emails and on people bothering to check multiple websites
  • Crucially, they all get an icon on the home screen.

Facebook is setting its sights on its next five billion users — even if they don’t yet have Internet access.

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Called Internet.org, the social network has joined forces with Nokia, Qualcomm, Samsung, Ericsson and others to bring web access to the five billion people, primarily in developing countries, that don’t own smartphones or have access to affordable connectivity.

“There are huge barriers in developing countries to connecting and joining the knowledge economy,” Zuckerberg said in a statement. “Internet.org brings together a global partnership that will work to overcome these challenges, including making internet access available to those who cannot currently afford it.”

According to the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals report, 2.7 billion people or 39 percent of the world’s population will be on the Internet before the end of 2013.

In a proposal entitled “Is Connectivity a Human Right?” Zuckerberg lays out his plans for the organization and its solutions to equipping the rest of the world with the tools to connect with each other and gain access to the world’s greatest repository of information. The “rough plan” focuses on spreading connectivity through mobile devices with three main “levers.”

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The Internet.org announcement comes just a few months after Google’s announcement of its Project Loon, which aims to bring connectivity to the rest of the world through Internet-equipped balloons. Announced in June, Google has begun testing the balloons in New Zealand and more recently in Northern California. Just this month Bill Gates criticized the project, saying that fighting malaria was more important.

Is internet access a fundamental human right? Facebook and a coalition of six major telecom companies believe it is.

On Tuesday night, they revealed Internet.org — a global partnership that wants to put the web’s vast trove of knowledge at the fingertips of every man, woman, and child around the world.

Today, just over one-third of Earth’s population has access to the internet, which means 4 billion to 5 billion others are unplugged. Facebook thinks we can do better.

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Joined by major communications providers like Samsung, Nokia, Qualcomm, and Ericsson, the global initiative will focus on three key challenges in developing countries:

1. Make access affordable. The organization believes this can be accomplished by developing lower-cost, higher-quality smartphones.

2. Use data more efficiently. The goal here is to develop better apps and compression tools to handle data more effectively. Facebook, for example, wants to lower its Android app’s data rate from the current 12 megabytes a day down to just one.

3. Have businesses drive local access. Facebook says this “includes testing new models that align incentives for mobile operators, device manufacturers, developers and other businesses to provide more affordable access than has previously been possible.”

“Everything Facebook has done has been about giving all people around the world the power to connect,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says in a statement. “There are huge barriers in developing countries to connecting and joining the knowledge economy. Internet.org brings together a global partnership that will work to overcome these challenges, including making internet access available to those who cannot currently afford it.”

The effort is just the latest example of a major technology firm seeking to shuttle potential growth opportunities under a humanitarian banner. It’s “a reflection of how tech companies are trying to meet Wall Street’s demands for growth by attracting customers beyond saturated markets in the United States and Europe,” says Vindu Goel at the New York Times, “even if they have to help build services and some of the infrastructure in poorer, less digitally sophisticated parts of the world.” (Facebook growth has largely stalled in existing markets at just over 1.1 billion users.)

Sources:

Seeking Alpha

abcnews.go.com

Alten Könige: The old kings of Investing

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Philip Fisher

 

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Philip Fisher is the father of investing in growth stocks. He started his own investment firm, Fisher & Company, in 1931, and managed it until his retirement in 1999 at the age of 91. Fisher achieved excellent returns for himself and his clients during his 70 year career.

Fisher focused on investing for the long term. He famously bought Motorola stock in 1955, and held it until his death in 2004. He created a fifteen point list of characteristics to look for in a common stock and were focused on two categories: management’s characteristics and the characteristics of the business. Important qualities for management included integrity, conservative accounting, accessibility and good long-term outlook, openness to change, excellent financial controls, and good personnel policies. Important business characteristics would include a growth orientation, high profit margins, high return on capital, a commitment to research and development, superior sales organization, leading industry position and proprietary products or services.

Benjamin Graham

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Benjamin Graham is most widely know for being a teacher and mentor to Warren Buffett. It is important to note, however, that he attained this role because of his work “father of value investing”. He made a lot of money for himself and his clients without taking huge risks in the stock market. He was able to do this because he solely used financial analysis to successfully invest in stocks. He was also instrumental in many elements of the Securities Act of 1933, which required public companies to disclose independently audited financial statements. Graham also stressed having a margin of safety in one’s investments – which meant buying well below a conservative valuation of a business.

George Soros

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George Soros is most commonly known as the man who “broke the Bank of England”. In September 1992, he risked $10 billion on a single trade when he shorted the British Pound. He was right, and in a single day made over $1 billion. It is estimated that the total trade netted almost $2 billion. He is also famous for running his Quantum Fund, which generated an average annual return of more than 30% while he was the lead manager.

Soros focuses on identifying broad macro-economic trends into highly leveraged plays in bonds and commodities. Soros is the odd-man out in the Top 10 Greatest Investors, has he doesn’t have a clearly defined strategy, more of a speculative strategy that came from his gut.

Winds of Change: Renewable Energy Stocks

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Clean Energy Boom

Leading clean energy stocks such as Tesla (NASD:TSLA), SolarCity (NASD:SCTY) and other solar stocks such as First Solar (FSLR) have been recently catching investors’ attention and producing stellar returns.

Since the last update on May 5th, my portfolio has advanced 3.0 percent for a 10.5 percent return for the first half.  However, the portfolio continues to lag both the broad market of small cap stocks as measured by my benchmark the iShares Russell 2000 Index (IWM), and the blistering performance of clean energy stocks, as measured by the leading clean energy ETF, the Powershares Wilderhill Clean Energy Index (PBW).

IWM inched up 2.7 percent for a 17.9 percent total return, while PBW rocketed up another 13.9 percent for a 34.9 percent total first half return.

The core of the problem was the renewable energy developers: Finavera Wind Energy (TSX-V:FVR, OTC:FNVRF), Alterra Power (TSX:AXY, OTC:MGMXF), US Geothermal (NYSE:HTM, TSX:GTH), and Ram Power Group (TSX:RPG, OTC RAMPF).  This group declined an average of 23 percent for the year (including the effects of the declining Canadian dollar), despite a number of positive developments for the individual names.  All are trading a a significant discount to the value of their assets, with Alterra and Ram Power cash flow positive, and US Geothermal profitable on a GAAP basis.  Finavera, meanwhile, is in the possess of selling its assets and I expect it to have cash equal to more than twice its current share price by the end of next year.

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GT Advanced Technologies Inc. (GTAT) may be a solar overlap now more than a solar pure-play, but it is back in focus now that Apple reached a pact with GT to supply sapphire glass for Apple products. Apple may be looking to work around the Gorilla Glass from Corning, but the gains if the project works out as well as the stock indicated could be a good omen for GT.

GT’s stock even managed to hit a new 52-week high above $10 this week on the Apple news. The question to ask is whether the Apple deal will be enough of a bang for the company to make leaps in the solar operations as well. The GT HiCz systems produce low-cost monocrystalline ingots for high-efficiency solar cells. Its DSS furnaces are also called the solar industry standard by the company itself, with more than 3,200 units shipped worldwide. After a 20% gain to $10.10, the stock is up about 300% from its 52-week low, and the consensus analyst price target was down around $7.60 on last look.

First Solar Inc. (FSLR) shares have somehow managed to come all the way back to more than $60.00. This is nearly triple from the lows of the last year. What has driven this interest so much of late was when First Solar managed to dazzle investors with its earnings. Some of the huge upside may have simply been in the timing of the revenue recognition. It seems odd that the stock jumped so much when you consider that sales guidance for year was effectively trimmed by about $200 million while it simultaneously raised its earnings guidance.

SunEdison Inc. (SUNE) almost brings back too much pain to trust as a serious and sustainable turnaround in the solar sector. This is the old MEMC outfit, which makes and sells silicon wafers to semiconductor and solar energy companies. The company now offers home solar solutions and intelligent energy solutions, and it announced plans to spin off its chip-related operations in August.

Source:

http://www.Finance.yahoo.com

To the Sun We Shall Journey: Best SRI mutual funds

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n the world of investing, conscience, it seems, costs nothing. You can have your do-gooder cake and eat it, too. Consider iShares MSCI USA ESG Select Index (symbol KLD), an exchange-traded fund that tracks an index of companies that it says follow high “environmental, social and governance” standards. Over the past five years, the fund returned an annualized 2.3%, compared with 1.7% for Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index. Calvert Equity Fund (CSIEX), one of the largest and oldest funds in the sphere of socially responsible investing, or SRI, gained 6.9% annualized over the past 15 years, compared with 5.5% for the S&P.

Socially responsible investing has come a long way since I started writing about it nearly 20 years ago. In 1995, there were only 55 mutual funds that engaged in SRI, with $12 billion in assets. Now there are 493, with assets of $569 billion. Socially responsible investors include “cor­porate responsibility and societal concerns” as “valid parts of investment decisions,” according to the Forum for Sustainable and Responsible Investment, a trade group.

there’s the fund that proves you don’t have to sacrifice profits at the altar of morality: Domini Social Equity. Its annual fee of 1.23% keeps it off my recommended list, but you can’t help liking the fund, which was founded by Amy Domini. As a stockbroker in 1980, Domini recognized that her clients wanted to put their money into responsible companies and to avoid bad actors. With Peter Kinder and Steve Lydenberg, she devised an SRI index of 400 stocks and launched a fund to follow it. Over the past 15 years, the fund gained an annualized 5.1%, trailing the S&P by less than half a point per year.

Since 2006, Domini has been actively managed, but you can still buy the index that Amy Domini helped develop through an ETF with yearly expenses of just 0.50%. The five-year return of iShares KLD 400 Social Index (DSI) has lagged the S&P by just 0.2 point per year. So, giving up practically nothing, you can get a warm feeling that your money is serving a useful purpose—even if the fund manager or index composer is deciding what that purpose should be. Not a bad deal.

 

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Ariel Fund – $863.5 million

The Ariel Fund is part of the family of mutual funds managed by Ariel Capital Management based in Chicago, IL. According to the firm the fund invests in companies with market capitalizations primarily under $1.5 billion, with an emphasis on small-cap stocks. Market capitalization is a way to determine the size of a company and is calculated by multiplying a firm’s outstanding shares by the dollar value of a single share. “Small-cap stocks” mean companies whose market capitalization is generally below $2 billion but above $300 million. The Arial Fund’s social criteria includes screens for environmental impact, tobacco, weapons, nuclear energy, and diversity.

Stock symbol:ARGFX

Pax World Balanced Fund – $1.5 billion

Part of the Pax World Mutual Funds family based in Portsmouth, NH. According to the firm, Pax World Balanced invests in companies “that provide goods and services, such as health care, technology, pollution control, housing, utilities, and education, that improve the quality of life.” Pax World Balanced is a “domestic hybrid” fund, meaning it holds a mix of stocks and bonds of U.S. based companies.

Stock symbol:PAXWX

PIMCO Total Return III Institutional – $2.225 billion

PIMCO is one of the largest fixed-income management firms in the world. The PIMCO Total Return III Institutional is a fund for institutional investors such as pension funds. The minimum investment is $5 million. According to the firm the fund invests primarily in corporate bonds, U.S. government securities, and mortgage-related securities. Its investments may not go to issuers who engage in “the operation of gambling casinos, the provision of healthcare services, or the manufacture of alcohol, tobacco products, pharmaceuticals, pornography, or military equipment.”

Stock symbol:PRFAX

Ariel Appreciation invests in “mid-cap” stocks, which are companies with a market capitalization generally between $2 billion and $10 billion. According to the company, Ariel Appreciation limits its investments to firms the size of $200 million to $5 billion. It uses the same screens as the larger Ariel Fund: environmental, tobacco, weapons, nuclear energy, and diversity.

Stock symbol:CAAPX

Parnassus Equity Income – $1.3 billion

Parnassus Equity Income is a member of the Parnassus Funds family based in San Francisco. As an equity income fund it tries to grow through price appreciation, but also by investing largely in dividend paying stocks. According to the firm, the fund can invest up to 10 percent of its assets in community development loan funds. It may not invest in companies “that produce alcohol, tobacco, weapons, or nuclear energy.”

Stock symbol:PRBLX

 

 

Sources at

http://www.kiplinger.com

http://socialinvesting.about.com/

 

Invest in a better world:SRI ( Socially Responsible Investing)

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An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common themes for socially responsible investments include avoiding investment in companies that produce or sell addictive substances (like alcohol, gambling and tobacco) and seeking out companies engaged in environmental sustainability and alternative energy/clean technology efforts.

Today, more than one out of every nine dollars under professional management in the United States—$3.74 trillion or more—is invested according to SRI strategies.
Individuals, institutions, investment companies, money managers and financial institutions apply SRI strategies across asset classes to promote stronger corporate social responsibility, build long-term value for companies and their stakeholders, and foster businesses, generate jobs or introduce products that will yield community and environmental benefits.  The institutions involved in SRI include corporations, universities, hospitals, foundations, insurance companies, public and private pension funds, nonprofit organizations and religious institutions.
What are the fastest growing areas of sustainable and responsible investing?
Alternative investments have become one of the most dynamic segments within the ESG investing space.  The number of alternative investment funds that consider environmental, social or corporate governance criteria has grown more rapidly than any of the other types of funds that US SIF Foundation tracked in its 2012 Report on Sustainable and Responsible Investing Trends in the United States. Alternative investment funds include social venture capital, double or triple bottom line private equity, hedge funds and property funds.  US SIF Foundation identified an estimated $132 billion in capital under the management of 301 alternative investment funds at the start of 2012, up dramatically from the $37.8 billion identified by US SIF Foundation in 177 funds just two years earlier, at the start of 2010.
Close behind in the rate of growth over the same two-year period were the assets of mutual funds that consider ESG criteria.  The number of such funds grew from 250 to 333, and their collective assets more than doubled—from $316 billion to $641 billion.

Social responsible investment

Social responsible investment

General Mills, Inc. (NYSE:GIS 3.10% Yield

General Mills is a manufacturer and marketer of branded consumer foods sold through retail stores. Co. is also a supplier of branded and unbranded food products to the foodservice and commercial baking industries. Co.’s major product categories in the U.S. are ready-to-eat cereals, refrigerated yogurt, ready-to-serve soup, dry dinners, shelf stable and frozen vegetables, refrigerated and frozen dough products, dessert and baking mixes, frozen pizza and pizza snacks, grain, fruit and savory snacks, and a range of organic products including granola bars, cereal, and soup. Co. has three operating segments: U.S. Retail; International; and Bakeries and Foodservice.

Equity Residential (NYSE:EQR 4.46% Yield

Equity Residential is a real estate investment trust focused on the acquisition, development and management of apartment properties. Co. is the general partner of, and at Dec 31 2012 owned an approximate 95.9% ownership interest in ERP Operating Limited Partnership (ERPOP), an Illinois limited partnership. All of Co.’s property ownership, development and related business operations are conducted through ERPOP and those entities/subsidiaries owned or controlled by ERPOP. As of Dec 31 2012, Co., directly or indirectly through investments in title holding entities, owned all or a portion of 403 properties located in 13 states and the District of Columbia consisting of 115,370 apartment units.

Eaton Corp plc (NYSE:ETN 2.35% Yield

Eaton is a power management company. Co. operates in six segments: Electrical Americas and Electrical Rest of World, which engaged in electrical components and systems; Cooper, which manufactures electrical products; Hydraulics, which provides hydraulics components, systems and services for industrial and mobile equipment; Aerospace, which supplies aerospace fuel, hydraulics and pneumatic systems for commercial and military use; Truck, which designs and manufactures a line of drivetrain and powertrain systems and components for commercial vehicles; and Automotive, which supplies automotive drivetrain and powertrain systems including components of cars, light trucks and commercial vehicles.

 HCP, Inc. (NYSE:HCP 5.76% Yield

HCP is a real estate investment trust engaged in investing primarily in real estate serving the healthcare industry. Co. acquires, develops, leases, manages and disposes of healthcare real estate, and provides financing to healthcare providers. Co.’s portfolio is comprised of investments in the following five healthcare segments: senior housing, post-acute/skilled nursing, life science, medical office and hospital. Co. makes investments within its healthcare segments using the following five investment products: properties under lease, debt investments, developments and redevelopments, investment management and investments in senior housing operations.

Sources:

http://www.etfchannel.com/